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Considering Gluten-Free? Why It’s Probably Not Necessary (and May Even Be Bad for You)

 

gluten-free_LARGE

 

The Gluten-free craze is one of the most popular dieting and weight loss trends since the turn of the century.

But, in reality, it’s probably not necessary for most of us and may even be harmful.

A little background on Gluten before we explain why you may not really need to worry about it.

 

What is Gluten? And why do we love it?

Gluten is a protein composite that gives wheat products like bread and cereal their chewy, flexible texture. It is found in most modern-day carbs and humans have been consuming it, in some form, for thousands of years.
So why did we break-up with bread?

In the early 2000s, cardiologist Dr. William Davis began advocating against gluten and wheat, a concept that quickly caught on with celebrities and others in the health space.

Dr. Davis’ 2011 book, “The Wheat Belly” quickly became a New York Times bestseller, and the gluten-free diet has inserted itself into pop culture ever since.

The Expert Truth About the Gluten-Free Diet

Here’s the thing: most people eating a gluten-free diet don’t need to be, and may actually be harming themselves.

A gluten-free diet should only be used by people who have celiac disease — an autoimmune disease where the body mounts an immune response to gluten, causing stomach pain, indigestion, diarrhea, bloating, gas and even osteoporosis. And, in reality, just 1 percent of the population actually has celiac disease.

“There is no harm with whole wheat unless you have the disease,” says Dr. Gabe Mirkin, fitness guru, long-time radio host and sports medicine doctor with more than 50 years of practice.

Mirkin is one of thousands of health experts who have come out against the idea of leveraging a gluten-free diet for health and weight loss.

In fact, he says people who eat whole wheat are actually better off.

“Virtually everybody agrees that people who eat a lot of wheat, these people live longer, have less cancer, fewer heart attacks, diabetes, etc.,” Mirkin says. “Whole grains prevent disease. That’s what all the literature supports.”

For example, on his website, Mirkin points to two studies published this year showing that gluten-free diets cause nutritional deficiencies:

The study in Clinical Nutrition (May 7, 2016) reviewed scientific studies published between 1990 and 2015 and found that most gluten-free diets:

  • Lacked fiber because low-fiber foods made from sugars, starches and refined flours were substituted for fiber-rich foods made from whole grains;
  • Lacked vitamins B12 and folate, and minerals such as iron, zinc, magnesium and calcium; and
  • Contained more high glycemic load foods and larger amounts of saturated and hydrogenated fats.

The study in The Journal of Pediatrics (May 13, 2016), from researchers at Dalhouse University in Canada, found that when given to children, gluten-free processed foods could cause:

  • Delayed growth and development because they often lack essential nutrients (the B vitamins, fiber, calcium, magnesium and iron); and
  • Weight gain because they are usually low in fiber and higher in sugar, other refined carbohydrates and fats.
Whoa, hold up a second.

Does that second study show that gluten-free diets can actually cause weight GAIN? Then why have so many of us been led to believe that gluten-free diets are a way to lose weight?

That’s a common misconception, Mirkin says.

“Yes, people who avoid flour and refined carbs can lose weight,” Mirkin says. “But the difference is between a whole grain and a ground grain, like flour.”

Processed flour, he says, can cause weight gain because it’s the result of wheat being ground up and refined into an ingredient that has little to no nutritional value (mostly to retain shelf life). That’s different than whole grains, which retain their fiber and other important nutrients, such as selenium, potassium and magnesium.

People do lose weight when they intentionally cut out gluten but it’s not because of the gluten, per se but rather that they have cut out things like cupcakes, chips, crackers, high-sugar cereals and the like. They lose weight because they’ve eliminated the refined flour — not the gluten.

So, wait, can I eat wheat or not?

According to the Whole Grains Council, when looking for a whole grain product, you should look at the list of ingredients to make sure it says; whole grain, whole wheat, whole wheat flour, and stone-ground whole wheat.

Processed wheat such as; wheat flour, semolina, durum wheat, organic flour and enriched flour (anything that doesn’t include the word “whole”), should only be consumed in moderation. If you find yourself at a bakery or restaurant where you don’t have access to an ingredients list, try to be conscious of the calorie content and portion so that your waistline doesn’t suffer.

Is a gluten-free diet right for you?

The best thing to do is to ask your doctor to give you an immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody (IgA TTG) test.

“If the test comes back negative, then it is extremely unlikely you have celiac disease and need a gluten-free diet,” Mirkin says.

 

If you feel like you react to gluten and may have an intolerance to it, cut it out for 3 months and then slowly feed it back into your diet. Make sure you take a good probiotic during the elimination and re-introduction phase so that your gut bacteria can assist with proper digestion and perhaps heal any damage you may have to your gut lining.

If you’re interested in cutting out refined flour and breads from your diet as a way to lose weight, take a look at Daily Dietitian’s Low Carb Diet instead, we will make things easy and delicious for you.

 

x DD

The less sweet side of artificial sweeteners

artificial sweeteners advice

I recently found a fantastic article outlining the effect of artificial sweeteners on our bodies and minds from the Food Junkie at Psychology Today.

I hope you enjoy reading it whilst sipping your unsweetened tea :)

“Excessive sugar intake has been linked to a range of maladies including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, accelerated aging, metabolic syndrome and obesity. It’s no wonder people are often looking for a “healthier” option to satisfy his or her sweet tooth. Currently there are 6 approved artificial sweeteners by the FDA; some of which are thousands of times sweeter than table sugar. Many are readily available, placed right next to the sugar packets on restaurant tables waiting to be sprinkled into coffee or tea, while others are incorporated into the processed “reduced sugar” and “diet” snacks foods that line the supermarket shelves.

Even though some people are hesitant to make the switch from sugar to artificial sweeteners due to other health concerns such as cancer and seizures, many people happily consume them on a daily basis. Artificial sweeteners sound great in theory- drinking diet soda, or eating “diet” snacks allows people to experience the sweet taste that he or she craves without the excess calories that come along with typical sugar laden foods. Even though they provide no calories or nutrients when ingested, there is mounting evidence linking artificial sweeteners to list of adverse effects when consuming them- including alterations in gut microflora, cognitive changes, as well as metabolic and endocrine disturbances- making them a less healthy alternative than originally thought.

While some studies have shown that they are helpful as a weight loss tool, the research is still mixed. In one study, people lost more weight and reported feeling less hungry when consuming artificial sweeteners compared to participants that did not. (1) Conversely, observational research shows that people who consume artificial sweeteners are more likely to be overweight or obese. (2) Making many question the utility of them as a diet aid in the first place (however, it is important to note that cause and effect cannot be determined in this type of study).

Logically, a food or beverage that provides no calories or nutrition should not have a physiological impact, however that does not seem to be the case. For one, the quantity needed to provide the perception of sweet taste is at a lower concentration than sugar. Therefore, repeated use may alter perception of sweet taste in some individuals, and the amount needed of dessert, like apple pie or a chocolate brownie is increased in order to get the same satisfaction. In addition, artificial sweeteners have been shown to alter levels of hormones that impact blood sugar control, similar to the effects observed after sugar ingestion.

Newer evidence also shows that artificial sweeteners can cross the blood brain barrier and may trick parts of the brain that control feelings of hunger and satiety. In one study, artificial sweeteners negatively impacted cognition and were associated with a poor future snack choice. This can sabotage weight loss goals and make dieting seem impossible when high calorie snacks are in sight. (3) (4)

Another area of interest is the affects it exerts over the microbiome. Although still in the early stages of research, the microbiome is emerging as a significant component of health. The bacterial stains that populate our intestine can be altered by a variety of factors, including comorbidities, weight status (some strains are more common in obese individuals versus lean) and what we eat- including artificial sweeteners. In one study, it took only 7 days for people consuming the upper acceptable limit of saccharin (set by the FDA) to show significant changes in gut flora. The bacterial strains found in their gut were strains that are associated with type 2-diabetes. Moreover, there was a decrease in glucose control (5)- having the opposite effect of what artificial sweeteners are intended to have.

Although more substantial research is needed and a “one size fits all” recommendation cannot be made, it’s becoming more apparent that artificial sweeteners may be contributing to the same problems that they were originally intended to alleviate, and more thought should be given to their use.”

References:

1. Peters JC, Wyatt HR, Foster GD, Pan Z, Wojtanowski AC, Vander Veur SS, Herring SJ, Brill C, Hill JO. The effects of water and non-nutritive sweetened beverages on weight loss during a 12-week weight loss treatment program. Obesity. 2014 Jun;22:1415-21.

2. Bleich SN, Wolfson JA, Vine S, Wang YC. Diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake among US adults, overall and by body weight. Am J Public Health. 2014 Mar;104:e72-8.

3. Burke MV, Small DM. Physiological mechanisms by which non-nutritive sweeteners may impact body weight and metabolism. Physiol Behav. 2015 Jun 3

4. Hill SE, Prokosch ML, Morin A, Rodeheffer CD. The effect of non-caloric sweeteners on cognition, choice, and post-consumption satisfaction. Appetite. 2014 12/1/;83:82-8.

5. Suez J, Korem T, Zeevi D, Zilberman-Schapira G, Thaiss CA, Maza O, Israeli D, Zmora N, Gilad S, et al. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota. Nature. 2014 Oct 9;514:181-6.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/food-junkie/201508/the-less-sweet-side-artificial-sweeteners

x DD

7 Easy Steps To A Happier, Healthier Gut

Healthier Gut

A properly functioning digestive system (a healthier gut) is critical to good health.

In fact, 60 -80% of our immune system is located in our gut, and 90% of our neurotransmitters (chemicals responsible for regulating mood) such as serotonin are made in our gut.

Problems in our gastrointestinal (GI) tract can cause more than just stomach pain, gas, bloating or diarrhea; they can be the root cause of many chronic health problems.

Gut imbalances have been linked to hormonal imbalances, autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and thyroid issues, diabetes, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, anxiety, depression, eczema and rosacea… just to name a few.

Still, the most common way people notice a problem in their gut is when they start regularly experiencing digestive issue like bloating, abdominal pain, constipation, or diarrhea.

While taking probiotics and drinking more water are helpful to your gut health, they’re not a cure for digestive issues.

Rather, the biggest factors in digestive health are your diet and lifestyle.

Here are nine easy steps we recommend for a healthier, happier gut:

1. Eat the right kind of fiber.

You may have heard that fiber helps with symptoms of constipation, but there are actually two types of fiber we should all be aware of: soluble fiber and insoluble fiber.

Soluble fibers actually slow digestion, which prevents quick spikes in your blood sugar, whereas insoluble fibers help move food through your intestines, which can help prevent constipation.

Insoluble fibers are found in nuts, whole wheat, whole grains, seeds, and rice, while soluble fibers can naturally be found in oats, beans, peas, flaxseed, berries, and apples.

Make sure to avoid soluble fibers added to processed foods that add sugar substitutes made from dextrose, sorbitol, and citric acid, which can cause gas and bloating.

2. Buy veggies with flavonoids.

Certain fruits and vegetables have more molecules known as flavonoids, which make up their bright pigments.
Flavonoids are very beneficial for your digestion due to their anti-inflammatory properties and they assist in digestion of starch. A powerful antioxidant, flavonoids are found in romaine lettuce, onions, Brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes, quinoa, and bell peppers. Incorporating more flavonoid-filled veggies can help you maintain healthier gut.

3. Find a method of stress management.

Stress not only affects your mental state but can also take a toll on your physical well-being. Stress negatively affects every part of your digestive system, causing your colon to spasm or even increases the acid in your stomach, causing indigestion.

If you’re not exercising regularly, we recommend finding a workout or active activity you can do at least three times per week for a healthier gut. It can relieve tension and release endorphins that improve your mood. Eating a healthy diet and deep breathing can also drastically relieve stress.

4. Sleep eight hours a night.

Many people who have GI problems also have issues falling asleep. Multiple studies have found a relationship between sleep disorders and GERD, IBS, IBD, and ulcers.

A solid eight hours of sleep is imperative to keep your digestive track healthy—and coincidentally keeps your mind and body healthy. So if you already suffer from a digestive issue, it’s important to work on your sleep schedule.

5. Avoid artificial sweeteners.

Artificial sweeteners can be extremely detrimental to your digestive health because they don’t get digested properly meaning bacteria will break them down and cause problems.

6. Make smart alcohol choices for a healthier gut.

Occasional alcohol intake is fine for your digestive system. However, excessively drinking alcohol can lead to digestive issues such as heartburn and inflammation of the stomach, and it can even increase the risk of small intestine cancers and leaky gut.

Not only does alcohol create problems, it can also increase symptoms of IBS and can cause both diarrhea and constipation.

7. Prevent “leaky gut.”

Bloating, gas, cramps, digestive irregularities, aches and pains are all symptoms of a leaky gut.

Leaky gut is just a term to describe the increased intestinal permeability that can happen if there’s inflammation in the intestines.

The gut is naturally permeable to very small molecules in order to absorb these vital nutrients.

In sensitive people, factors like gluten, toxins, stress and age can cause the gut cells to release a protein that can break apart tight junctions in the intestinal lining. Once these tight junctions get broken apart, you have a leaky gut.

When your gut is leaky, things like toxins, microbes, undigested food particles, and more can escape from your intestines and travel throughout your body via your bloodstream. Your immune system marks these “foreign invaders” as pathogens and attacks them. The immune response to these invaders can appear in the form of any of the nine signs you have a leaky gut, which are listed below.

9 signs you may have a leaky gut:

  1. Digestive issues such as gas, bloating, diarrhea or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
  2. Seasonal allergies or asthma.
  3. Hormonal imbalances such as PMS or PCOS.
  4. Diagnosis of an autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, lupus, psoriasis, or celiac disease.
  5. Diagnosis of chronic fatigue or fibromyalgia.
  6. Mood and mind issues such as depression, anxiety, ADD or ADHD.
  7. Skin issues such as acne, rosacea, or eczema.
  8. Diagnosis of candida overgrowth.
  9. Food allergies or food intolerances.

*NOTE: If you’re constantly experiencing digestive irregularities and diet changes are not making a difference, go to a medical professional, such as a gastroenterologist, who will help you diagnose your symptoms correctly and effectively.

x DD


If you’d like advice on getting a healthier gut, book a consultation with a Dietitian.

Healthy “No-tella” spread

No-tella

After seeing this picture, I am sure you are as shocked as we were when seeing exactly what makes up our beloved chocolate spread.

Although we dislike all of these ingredients (except for hazelnuts), the ingredient we dislike most and which makes up almost half of the jar is sugar!

Nevertheless, our love of this chocolatey, hazelnutty blend of deliciousness meant that we had to explore a new healthier version. Try this healthy “No-tella” on hot rye toast, drizzled across a bowl of sliced banana or as a treat eaten straight out of the jar with a spoon!

Hazelnuts, which are the main ingredient, are filled with numerous vitamins, minerals, protein, fibre and heart-healthy fats, all of which are vital for supporting your body and digestion. Even better, they’re particularly rich in vitamin E which is the most important vitamin for maintaining beautifully clean and shiny skin, hair and nails. Cacao, the bean which all chocolate is made from, also has numerous beneficial nutrients in this raw, unprocessed state as it is packed with iron, fibre, calcium, zinc, potassium and antioxidants, unfortunately these benefits disappear when it is processed and refined to make conventional chocolate though, which is why this “No-tella” trumps the original version any day.

No-tella Recipe (Makes 1 jar)

  • 2 cups of hazelnuts
  • 1/2 a cup of water
  • 1/2 a cup of xylitol syrup
  • 3 tablespoons of raw cacao powder
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla essence

Bake the hazelnuts at 180C for about ten minutes, then take them out of the oven and allow them to cool.

Once cool place them in a food processor and blend for about ten minutes, until they totally break down. Then add the xylitol syrup, vanilla essence and cacao and blend again, before gradually pouring in the water – it’s important that the first four are properly mixed before you add the water though as you may not need it all.

Enjoy x DD

11 Healthy Holiday Eating Tips

Healthy Holiday Eating

Can someone enjoy healthy holiday eating? There are healthy, balanced ways to maintain your weight during the holidays, and none of the ones below include crash dieting. Daily Dietitian gives you 11 different ways you can maintain a balanced regimen during a time of year when eating and drinking is paramount…

Tips For Staying Balanced During with Healthy Holiday Eating this Season:

  1. Apple Cider Vinegar: Everyday! When? In the morning or after your first meal. Why? It helps alkalinize your body especially after nights out drinking. It’s rich in acetic acid, which can help to lower the rise in glucose that occurs after eating which helps moderate our blood sugar and energy levels. Apple cider vinegar has also been shown to suppress fat storage in the body and aids in digestion by promoting the production of digestive enzymes!
  2. Eat a handful of greens before each meal. Committing to a small plate of greens before each meal helps to add fiber and more raw enzymes into your diet – and will control how much you eat next because you begin to feel full more quickly! Eating fiber also helps to control blood glucose levels, so it does not yoyo if you are eating lots of simple carbohydrates and sugars. Top the greens with a squeeze of lemon, a little olive oil and sea salt.
  3. Eat cultured vegetables with meals. They help with digestion, especially when eating rich foods and heavy proteins. Add some chopped raw sauerkraut or kimchi to small green salads through out the day. These fermented foods help keep the flora of the gut healthy.
  4. Pack your smoothies with lots of nutrients! If you opt for a smoothie make one that is loaded with greens and has no added sugars. When picking fruit, go for dark berries like blueberries. Adding avocado or coconut oil slows the release of energy and helps to moderate blood sugar levels, along with the added fiber from the flax or chia. Try different green leaves such as kale, dandelion, and collard greens. Add fruits that are high in antioxidants and add peeled and whole lemons, grapefruits, and limes for liver detox.
  5. Lemon juice aids in digestions, helps create enzymes, and helps control blood sugar levels. When eaten on greens, it helps our bodies absorb iron from these green vegetables, and ensures that we avoid processed salad dressings full of chemicals and sugars.
  6. Snack on nuts, seeds, and healthy fats instead of sugary treats throughout the day to offset some of the indulgence in sweet desserts later. You can also snack on sugar-free vegetable based snacks high in fiber, protein, and rich with antioxidants.
  7. Drink water all day. Drinking water is especially important with all the holiday coffees and social drinking. It is easy to get dehydrated. Sipping on warm non-caffeinated tea all day or water with lemon is always good. Once you are out in the evening try to make a 1:1 rule by drinking a big glass of water in between drinks. Your waiter may not like you but your body will.
  8. Schedule festive lunches or plan for earlier dinners if you can. Eating late at night is hard on the body. If you have to go out for late big dinners choose to eat a meal that is more veggie dense and salad based rather than the giant meat option. Try to be a vegetarian if you are eating after 7pm.
  9. Chew well. This will help everything! If you slow down to eat the food you will eat less and digest better.
  10. Exercise. Wake up and spend ten minutes stretching, followed by five minutes of deep breathing. Complete 30 minutes of exercise, either in the morning or whenever this fits into your schedule.
  11. Eat the majority of the calories in the beginning and middle of the day. Focus on high protein and fat for the morning. Avoiding cereals and instant oatmeal will help the body control blood sugar more efficiently for the rest of the day. When we start off with a blood sugar blast, we crash and get hungry again.

If you fall off the wagon of healthy holiday eating, don’t be too hard on yourself. We will be open from the 4th January 2016 to feed you and help you get you health back on track! Place your orders now to ensure you kick your year off to a good start!

x DD

Dietitian Leigh-Ann joins the Joburg Daily Dietitian team

Hey Joburg,

We’ve got some great news…Leigh-Ann Silber has joined the Daily Dietitian team!

Yes she’s experienced, yes she’s smart and yes she’s gorgeous. Wow, what a combo!

To give you a little more background, Leigh-Ann is a registered dietitian and nutritional consultant, with over 16 years’ experience. She is passionate about nutrition and wellness (obviously), AND, for all those moms out there, has a special focus on children’s health and functional nutrition.

Leigh-Ann received her Bachelor of Dietetics from the University of Pretoria in 1999, while also completing her undergraduate degree in psychology. She has a diploma in Training and Skills Development and has completed courses in Food Science & Technology and courses in Functional Nutrition, Translational Genetics and Culinary Nutrition. She is one of the first dietitians in South Africa to attend the Field to Plate culinary Nutrition workshop! Yup, she’s a keeper :)

An active figure within South Africa’s nutrition industry, Leigh-Ann has worked in a variety of roles ranging from private practice, nutritional education and training, sales, research and development, as well as nutritional communications and marketing.

Leigh-Ann is registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa and is also a member of the Association for Dietetics of Southern Africa (ADSA), having served as an executive board member from 2006 to 2009. She represents ADSA at the Health Products Association and Infant Feeding Association.

In addition to consulting to and representing Daily Dietitian, Leigh-Ann runs a children’s practice from Talk Sense, Bryanston and an adults practice at the Integrated Medical Centre in Bryanston.

Welcome Leigh-Ann, we are so excited to have you on board!

Leigh-Ann Silber Daily Dietitian

x DD

How to manage your energy levels and decrease your sugar intake

Decrease Sugar
A steady, even blood sugar level is key to a healthy body. Unfortunately, many people ride the blood sugar rollercoaster. They have toast with jam for breakfast, need something sweet after lunch, and are gagging for a coffee when 3pm rolls around. These constant energy lifts and crashes are signs of imbalance. Here are some tips decreasesugar and still maintain your energy.

How blood sugar works

When we ingest high-GI foods (like processed and refined foods), we release glucose, causing a rapid spike in our blood sugar levels. Some of that glucose is used for energy; however, our body only needs a limited amount to function so the excess is stored as – yep, you guessed it – fat. After that glucose has been distributed (and after it spikes our blood sugar), we crash quickly, experiencing fatigue, hunger and irritation. It’s a fast rise, and an even faster come down. When our energy is low, we crave carbohydrates and sugar to pick us up. And the cycle starts over.

What about insulin?

Insulin is secreted by the pancreas, and is in charge of moving glucose into cells. The problem is, it’s a fat storage hormone. So when you regularly have excessive glucose, you’re left with insulin resistance, which is the precursor to diabetes. Insulin also blocks the effects of the leptin hormone, the one that signals to our brain that we’re full. That’s why people with a high-sugar diet tend to overeat – they literally don’t know when to stop. Thanks to the rise of processed foods (and very clever marketing!), there are record numbers of people with high insulin levels.

Here are the benefits of having a stable blood sugar levels:

  • Increased energy
  • Stable mood
  • Improved concentration
  • Weight loss
  • Reduced cravings
  • Hormonal balance
  • Minimised risk of disease

The balancing act to decrease sugar

Want to get off the rollercoaster for good?

  • Enjoy low-GI foods (like veggies, lean protein, wholegrains, and good fats) to allow for the slow release of energy.
  • Eat protein with each meal.
  • Switch to 5-6 small meals a day.
  • Add good fats to your meal, particularly at lunch. This should reduce sugar cravings.
  • Include a healthy, protein-rich snack in between meals.
  • Eat breakfast within an hour of waking up,and make sure it includes protein and a healthy fat.
  • Avoid sugar and refined carbs (e.g. white bread, pasta, lollies) – these are the worst offenders!
  • Limit yourself to 2 portions of fruit a day. Berries are the best choice.
  • Avoid soda, fruit juice and artificial sweeteners like the plague.
  • Manage your stress. Our stress hormones, adrenaline and cortisol, are directly linked to blood sugar. Stress does not do your body any favours.
  • Reduce stimulants like alcohol, caffeine and nicotine.
  • Have a teaspoon of cinnamon a day.

TOP TIP:

BRUSH YOUR TEETH AFTER DINNER TO STOP YOURSELF FROM EATING DESSERT :)

Supplements that help regulate blood sugar

Support yourself with chromium, magnesium, B complex and vitamin C. Chat to your nutritionist or naturopath for more information.

Curbing your sweet tooth

When your blood sugar is stable, you automatically crave less sugar. Then, start adding more dark, leafy greens to your plate. Think kale, spinach, broccoli, and rocket. This will trick your tastebuds into appreciating bitter foods over sweet ones. Greens are also loaded with magnesium, the nutrient that regulates blood sugar. Step it up a notch by squeezing lemon juice over rocket before your meals, and adding vanilla extract to smoothies and yoghurt.

Then, try to get to the root of your cravings. What are you really hungry for? Since sweet treats are associated with joy (like birthdays), many people crave sugar when they are unhappy about something. We think that cookie is going to make us feel better, when in fact it just makes us feel worse. Whenever I crave something sweet, I either make myself a delicious and wholesome alternative (like sweet potato brownies), or I do something else that makes me happy, such as reading a magazine, going for a walk with my dog, chatting to my friends, or having a bath.

If you need help getting on the right track, email us on hello@dailydietitian.co.za and we’ll be happy to help!

x DD